Top 5 Things to do in Trevinano, Italy

Discover our exclusive list of the Top 5 things to do around the Trevinano area in Italy!

1. Visit – Civita di Bagnoregio

Castle In The Sky - Bagnoregio Italy
Civita di Bagnoregio is a fascinating medieval city in central Italy.

Isolated on an eroded spur of volcanic tufa, this improbably perched hamlet is famous as il paese che muore – the dying village. But patronage from the likes of Prince Charles and Unesco have helped shore up what’s left of the slowly crumbling borgo, and today this once inaccessible community with a winter population of fewer than 20 souls is one of the area’s main tourist draws. Reached via a bracingly modern pedestrian bridge, Civita has little to offer beyond some craft shops and photogenic plant-draped tufa houses (the house where Saint Bonaventure was born has long since fallen into the valley along with dozens of others), but it’s still an unmissable sight.

See our listing in Italy : Le Ville Di Trevinano

2. Explore – La Riserva Naturale Monte Rufeno

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Monte Rufeno nature reserve occupies more than 7,000 acres of rolling oak forest on the borders of Lazio, Umbria and Tuscany. It’s a wild corner of Italy, the haunt of boar and porcupine. Inside the reserve, three stone casali (farmhouses) offer simple – some might say spartan – accommodation, ranging from doubles with en suites to quad rooms. Large groups can rent an entire farmhouse, with kitchen. If you prefer to be cooked for, the restaurant at five-room Casale Monaldesca serves hearty local fare. The reserve is crisscrossed by walking, biking and riding trails, and there are horses for hire.

See our listing in Italy : Le Ville Di Trevinano

3. Relax – Il Bagnaccio hot spring

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One of the joys of the volcanic northern reaches of Lazio is the abundance of hot springs, perfect for a restorative wallow. Some, especially around Viterbo, have been channelled into thermal resorts with a faintly institutional feel, but many rise in open countryside and attract a democratic mix of locals (who see free thermal pools as a basic human right) and adventurous tourists. One of the best is Il Bagnaccio, where pools have been carved out of white clay in a bucolic landscape that can’t have changed much since Etruscan times. Bring a towel and claim your corner.

See our listing in Italy : Le Ville Di Trevinano

4. See – Lake Bolsena

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Largest of the three volcanic lakes north of Rome, Bolsena is the most characterful (and least thronged with daytrippers). Of the lake towns, Bolsena itself has the readiest charm, with its centro storico and Collegiata di Santa Cristina church, a historical layer cake whose earliest parts date from 11th century. The little town of Marta on the southern shore – scene of an evocative spring procession called La Barabbata on 14 May – is also worth a visit, but perhaps best of all is Isola Bisentina, a romantic island reached by ferry from Bolsena, Marta or Capodimonte. With seven oratories in various states of disrepair and an artfully gothic landscape cared for by present owner Prince Giovanni del Drago, it’s a fine place for a tryst, a swim or a picnic.

See our listing in Italy : Le Ville Di Trevinano

5. Drink – Sergio Mottura wines

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Orvieto may be better known, but some of the best white wines in the area between Rome and Florence are made around Civitella d’Agliano, an unassuming town half an hour’s drive east of Lake Bolsena. The leading producer is a cultured gentleman by the name of Sergio Mottura, whose main cellar occupies a 16th-century manor house that doubles as an 11-room country-chic hotel and summer restaurant, La Tana dell’Istrice (the porcupine’s burrow). The estate’s award-winning Poggio della Costa white, made from 100% grechetto grapes, is a snip at €10.80 a bottle at the cellar door.

See our listing in Italy : Le Ville Di Trevinano

 

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